Ferrets as Pets – Be Prepared for the Commitment

I took my fuzzy babies to the vet yesterday for a check-up and vaccinations. Boy, was it ever an ordeal for them! I think they’re still mad at me.

At one point, I was explaining to the doc how I found Rikki. And it got me reflecting later on finding this poor little creature out in the wet and cold. At the time, I was sure someone was frantic about losing their baby – until no one claimed this beautiful little animal. I checked everywhere I could think of to find her owner: pet store, vets, SPCA, ARF (Animal Rescue Foundation), and so on.

What I found out in the process was quite a shock to me.

I was informed that a lot of people buy ferrets on impulse because they are cute and Ferret Playingentertaining little animals. But then these people realize how much money and time is involved in taking care of them properly. So they just toss their ferrets outside to fend for themselves.

I can’t stress strongly enough that ferrets have been domesticated for so long, they hardly ever make it on their own.

In fact, I was shocked to find out that there are rescue foundations for ferrets just as for dogs and cats. I have a hard time thinking there are people in this world who would abandon any animal – let alone a small defenseless animal like a ferret.

What it amounts to is this. If you don’t have the time or money to invest in these sweet, adorable, funny, and loveable pets, then don’t get one.

Also, if you have young children who just have to have a pet ferret, keep in mind that, more than likely, a large share of the ferret-care burden will fall on your shoulders. Ferrets as pets take a real commitment that many children just aren’t prepared for.

So . . . make sure you are prepared for the commitment it takes to be a responsible ferret owner. For there may not someone around to take home your burdensome Mitzi or Rudy or Bella.