Making Sure Ferret Toys are Safe

Pet ferrets, of course, love their sleep time, but play time is what really makes them light up. And that means ferret toys – and lots of ‘em. But you need to make sure the toys you get forA Collection of Ferret Toys your favorite fuzzies are truly ferret safe.

Below are a few guidelines for making sure your ferret’s toys are suitable and safe:

  1. Make sure the ferret toys you purchase are specifically designed for ferrets. Ferrets can chew through dog or cat toys in seconds, thanks to their sharp teeth and strong jaws. This means it’s possible for them chew off and ingest small bits of these toys and ingest – which can lead to choking and/or intestinal blockage.
  2. Ensure that the toys are free of small decorations that can be chewed off and swallowed. This includes ribbons, bows, jingle bells, buttons, etc. As a general rule, ferret toys and toy attachments should be at least two inches square to avoid the possibility of  the toys or their parts being swallowed.
  3. Make sure all ferret tunnels and nesting holes are at least four inches in diameter so your ferret won’t get stuck.
  4. Likewise, make sure all ball toys are at least two inches in diameter so your ferret won’t choke on them.
  5. Avoid toys made of cardboard, rubber, foam, plastic, Styrofoam, and wood chips. Also avoid easily chewable fabric, including socks, hosiery, drawstrings, etc. Use only the starch packing peanuts – and NOT Styrofoam packing peanuts – if you want a ferret dig box.
  6. Carefully examine your ferret’s toys at least once a week. Replace any loose stuffing, and repair any torn seams. Discard any plastic toys that have cracked or have loose parts. Clean any toys that have become stained, and use plain water so your ferret won’t ingest anything toxic.

Also, if your pet ferret seems to have lost interest in a favorite toy that is still in good shape, clean it and then put it aside in a hidden place for a few weeks. When you bring it out again, your ferret is likely to see it as a brand new toy.

More Ferret Training – Litter-Box Training Your Pet Ferrets

Teaching your pet ferret to use her litter box is essential for her health. It keeps the rest of the cage and play areas clean and feces free. It also goes a long way toward building a good relationship between your ferret the rest of the household.

Litter training pet ferrets begins with getting the right litter pans and the right ferret litter. Ferrets like to back up into a fairly tight space (usually a corner) to do their business. So I suggest using a triangle-shaped corner litter box with two high sides and a lower front side for easy entry. You also need to use a quality dust-free litter. I’ve tried several kinds of cat litter but none of them was really satisfactory. I’ve finally settled on Critter Litter, and I and my ferrets (Rikki and Possum) are very happy with it.

As with any animal or person, it is best to start potty training a pet ferret when he is is young. It can be done at any age, but it just takes a little more work and little more time with older ferrets. When you introduce your ferret to his new home, notice where he poops and place the litter box there. (Ferrets tend to poop several times an hour, so it won’t take long.) Some people find it helpful to put immovable objects in every corner of the cage except the one for the litter box. If possible, place a small piece of poop in the box for a visual and olfactory cue.

As you get to know your ferret, you’ll soon learn the signs that indicate she is about to poop. When you see her backing into a corner, for instance, be ready. Try to get her into her litter pan before she does her business. If she does it in the pan, reward your ferret with a treat for a job well done.

Also, place your ferret in the litter box when he first wakes up because this is a common time for pooping. Also, at the end of playtime, set your ferret on the litter box and wait. If he uses it, offer a treat. If he doesn’t, withhold the treat. (You may need to be careful, though, because some ferrets are good at faking it.) Within a few days, your ferret should get the idea.

It might not seem very pleasant, but get in the habit of examining your ferret’s feces. A change in the color, texture, or frequency may signal a health problem that needs to be addressed. (Getting Started with Pet Ferrets has a helpful section on this.)

My male panda ferret has proven to be quite “stubborn” when it comes to litter training. So, I’ll soon buy another ferret litter pan. That way, there will be one for every corner of the lower level of the cage and one for each of his favorite corners in my room. Sometimes, you justPanda Ferret in Litter Pan have to do what you gotta do.

It may take some time for a ferret to learn to use a litter box, especially if the kit was removed from its mother before she could train it to do so. So just be patient. Never hit your ferret when he makes a mistake. Above all, never rub his nose in an “accident.” (Your ferret could breathe in some of the fecal matter and get sick from it.)

Ferret Training – Harness Training Your Pet Ferret

Just like our human children, our fuzzy kids need fresh air and sunshine to be in their best health. It’s a good idea, then, to get your pet ferret outdoors as often as you can. But keep in mind that ferret SAFETY comes first. And a good way to ensure your ferret’s safety when Panda Ferret Playing in Ferret Toy Tunnelshe’s outdoors is by keeping her on a harness and leash. This will allow her freedom of movement while still keeping her close enough for you to ensure safety.

In the beginning, though, ferrets dislike wearing a harness because it is unfamiliar to them. But, still, that harness is important for them to wear whenever you take them outside. So you need to train them to accept and wear. Here’s how:

  1. Start when your ferret is very young (around 10 weeks old).
  2. Put the harness on your ferret. (Offer a treat if he doesn’t keep still while you put the harness on.)
  3. Let your ferret wear the harness for five minutes or so. Offer a treat and then remove the harness.
  4. Repeat Steps 2 and 3 every day until your ferret starts to feel comfortable in the harness. Gradually increase the amount of time he wears the harness.
  5. When your ferret seems to be comfortable with the harness, attach the leash (lead).
  6. Let your ferret run around the house freely with the harness and lead for a few minutes each day (similar to Steps 2-4). Monitor your ferret to be sure the leash does not get caught in furniture, doors, etc.
  7. When your ferret seems comfortable with the lead, hold the lead but let the ferret lead you.
  8. Gradually, start to use the leash to guide your ferret where you want him to go. Offer a treat each time he follows your guidance.
  9. When your ferret seems comfortable with a leash and harness, take him outdoors for short walks. Allow your ferret to explore safely, using the leash to direct him away from dangers. Lengthen your walks and extend your ferret’s range as appropriate.

Note: Always bring water and treats with you when going outside with your ferret. Make sure all your ferret’s vaccines are up to date, and do not take your ferret outside in temperatures below 0 degrees F (-18 degrees C) or above 78 degrees F (26 degrees C). Most ferrets enjoy playing in snow, but if you let them do so, be sure you can rescue them from deep drifts.

Ferret Odor Revisited

If you’ve owned a pet ferret for any length of time, then you’re no doubt acquainted with your pet’s distinctive, um, ferret odor. A ferret’s unique scent can sometimes be a problem for new owners of pet ferrets. Fortunately, you have a few options if you dislike having a “stinky Ferret Odor Solutionslinky.”

First, keep in mind that a ferret’s scent is simply a natural part of its existence. Ferrets, being related to skunks, have scent glands located near the anus (although a pet ferret doesn’t use her glands for defense the way a skunk does). Usually, these glands are removed when the ferret is quite young (generally at the same time it is being spayed or neutered). And if you got your ferret from a pet store it has most likely been “de-scented.”

But in some countries removing the scent glands is considered to be abusive and therefore not performed. If you are adopting a pet ferret from outside the US, be sure to find out whether the animal has been de-scented.

If your pet has not been de-scented, he may release a distinctive (and pretty strong) musk-like odor when excited, afraid, or angry. But once your ferret has calmed down, the smell usually dissipates fairly quickly.

Removing the scent glands will eliminate most of the musky ferret odor. It may recur, however, if you don’t take care of your ferret properly. And this happens because ferrets have oil glands that also emit a musky odor.

While it may seem counterintuitive, you should NOT bath your ferret frequently to control this ferret odor. Too much bathing will actually make the problem worse because frequent baths will wash away the natural oils that actually help protect your fuzzy’s health. Bathe your ferret no more than about once a month.

(Also be aware that a persistent, strong ferret smell could signal that its teeth and/or ears could use some cleaning.  If the problem persists after you’ve thoroughly cleaned these areas, you should take your pet ferret see her vet.)

Now, while most ferret owners adjust to their fuzzies’ unique “odor,” other members of the family often do not. Family (and friends) may complain about this smell. But not to worry – this ferret odor can be controlled (though not eliminated entirely) quite easily.

You can control pet ferret odor with a product called GoodBye Odor for Ferrets. I use it because it works – and I wouldn’t be without it.

Ferret Proofing Your Home – Keeping Your Pet Ferrets Safe

Okay, so you’ve purchased, adopted, or rescued your first pet ferret(s). You’ve also gathered and/or purchased all the ferret cage(s), supplies, accessories, and ferret toys you think you and your new fuzzy will need. But your job isn’t finished yet.

Ferrets are surprisingly agile and nimble, and they love to burrow and tunnel into everything – Panda Ferret in Laundry Basketyes, everything. They can flatten out and crawl through cracks and into spaces (e.g., under doors, between cushions, around barriers) that seem impossibly narrow. So, if your home isn’t ready, your ferret and your possessions could be at risk.

Here, then, are a few tips to help you prepare a safe haven for your fuzzy.

  • Crawl around your ferret’s space and try your best to get a ferret’s-eye view of your home. What attractive nuisances do you see? Look for holes in the walls and in furniture cushions – a ferret can squeeze into a remarkably small space – tall cabinets from which they could fall, easily opened and entered drawers, electrical cords and drapery pulls that look like tempting chew items, climbable trash cans, and accessible toxic plants. Plug up any holes and cracks you may find, install child-proof latches and outlet covers, and put away delicate knick-knacks – anything you can do to make the place ferret safe.
  • Keep trash cans out of your ferret’s room if at all possible. If you really do need a trash can in the ferret’s space, choose one that can be sealed tightly. Trash cans not only carry germ-laden materials, but they can trap an exploring ferret inside.
  • If you plan to allow your ferret free run of the house (and, of course, you would allow this only when you or a responsible person is present), keep the bathroom door closed. Seal off the bottom as well if your fuzzy could crawl under it. As a precaution, put away all cosmetics, medications, and toiletries. If possible, install a shower door rather than using a shower curtain. Keep the toilet lid down and/or install a child-proof latch.
  • Likewise, seal off your kitchen when your ferrets are loose because they could become trapped in or around appliances or get burned when exploring the stove. As a precaution, put all food items away, including condiments.
  • Do not allow your ferrets on or near upholstered furniture. They could chew on the stuffing and fabric, which could be a choking hazard (in addition to damaging an expensive piece of furniture). They could also become trapped in reclining-chair mechanisms.
  • Also, close off your laundry area. Don’t ever let your ferret take a ride in the laundry basket on your way to doing the wash. Too many ferrets have gone through the washer and dryer cycle, unbeknownst to their owners, with tragic results.
  • Keep all chemicals, fragile items, and valuables out of the reach of your ferrets at all times.

Once your ferret is home, get into the habit of watching out for her. Carefully inspect your couch or recliner before you sit down. Close all doors slowly, including refrigerator and cabinet doors. Check your washer, dryer, and laundry basket before you do a new load. Put away all hazardous chemicals. Avoid carrying large or awkward loads if there’s a chance of stumbling over your ferret.

(N.B.: Sometimes, veterinarians will allow you to quarantine your new ferret in their offices for a week or two. Not only is this an excellent way to be sure your ferret is healthy and disease free, but it also buys you some time to prepare your home.)

For more tips on ferret safety and ferret care, see Getting Started with Pet Ferrets.

Feeding Ferrets – A Few Common Problems and Some Suggestions

Pet ferrets are, most of the time, healthy eaters without any severe food-related problems. Occasionally, though, you’ll encounter some problems when it comes to ferret food and feeding ferrets. Below are a few of the most common ferret-feeding issues and some suggestions on how to handle them. But keep in mind that if a problem persists you need to get your fuzzies to the vet.

Picky Eaters and Underweight Ferrets
Sometimes pet ferrets can seem to be picky eaters, or your ferret may suddenly begin eating a lot less than usual and losing weight. If you’ve determined with certainty that this isn’t the result of some underlying health issue, here are some things you can try. (Also, if you’ve just adopted an adult ferret and don’t know her preferences, you might try these tricks.)

  • Drizzle some warm water on the ferret kibble or even soak the kibble in water for a few minutes. Ferrets often find the softened kibble more palatable and tend to eat it better.
  • Puree the food and, using an eyedropper, feed it to your ferret – in the jaw socket, NEVER directly down the throat.
  • Place a few drops of a veterinarian-recommended fatty-acid supplement onto the food.
  • Keep experimenting with a variety of flavors and brands.
  • In a pinch, try pureed, meat-based baby food. (But, remember, this should be only a very short-term solution.)

If the problem persists, see your veterinarian. Your ferret may be sick or recovering from an injury. If so, you will need to give him lots of special attention to help him to gain and maintain a proper weight.

Overweight Ferrets
Being overweight is generally a pretty rare problem in ferrets because they are so active (when they’re awake that is.) They burn off their excess calories, and they are usually pretty good about eating only what they need. Occasionally, though, it happens, and here’s what you can try:

  • Put only a small amount of food in the bowl at each feeding and refill it when your ferret appears ready to eat again. Leave the food bowl empty for an hour or two each day may do the trick.
  • Encourage your ferret to exercise by playing with it for longer periods of time.
  • Monitor how much your ferret eats. If he doesn’t seem to be eating as much as usual, but still looks overweight, he may have an intestinal blockage or another illness.

Young ferrets
Baby ferrets are a special case. Ferret kits are usually weaned when they are about one and a half to two months old. At that point, they may be given water with just a small amount of very soft ferret food. (The consistency is usually compared to pea soup.) Kits need a lot of water to avoid a swollen stomach, which could lead to constipation and a prolapsed rectum (a condition that often requires surgery). (And be sure to offer your kit a variety of ferret-friendly foods. The various tastes will help avoid the problem of “picky eaters.”)

Over the next several weeks, the pea soup-like food is gradually thickened until at last, at about three months of age, the kit is eating dry food. However, be sure to monitor her water intake to be sure your kit is drinking enough.

General Ferret-food Tips
Here are a few rules of thumb to help you feed your ferret well:

  • Always clean the food dishes thoroughly every day.
  • A ferret’s age-related eating patterns are similar to a human’s. An adolescent will eat everything in sight in preparation for a growth spurt. An “old-timer” will likely eat less as he becomes less active.
  • Never force feed a ferret.
  • Don’t let your ferret eat non-food items. Common items that tempt ferrets include cloth, plastic, rubber bands, and sponge rubber. These can block the intestines or lead to choking. (If your ferret does happen to eat a non-food item, you may have to monitor the litter box and determine whether all of it has passed through the digestive tract. You may even have to piece the item together to determine whether something is still trapped inside the ferret’s body. If so, contact your vet.)
  • Inappropriate biting or nipping does not usually signify a hunger problem. More likely, it’s aggression and is a behavior the ferret should be trained away from doing.
  • Make sure you have food bowls that will not tip or spill easily.Story about a Boy and His Pet Ferret
  • Consider getting several food bowls if you have many ferrets. You may need to do so if you suspect one or more of them has a feeding problem or if you need to administer medications through their food.
  • Don’t let other pets share your ferret’s food and vice versa.

It will take some effort on your part, but try to get to know your ferret’s eating habits. Measure the food carefully at first and watch how long it takes for it to disappear. Also, notice which foods your ferret likes and dislikes. Pay attention to changes in eating patterns and preferences, and ask your vet for advice when they occur.

Feeding Your Pet Ferret and Ferret Food

Ferrets are carnivores and need diets high in protein and low in fat. And that means meat,Pet Ferret and Puppy Eating Ferret Food fish, and poultry.

Also, just as humans should avoid sugar and non-nutritious food, ferrets must avoid them as well. Formerly, ferret experts recommended such ferret treats s raisins, cereal, and ice cream, but they have since learned that these are not ideal and should be given to pet ferret only very infrequently if at all.

Ferrets digest their food amazingly fast, with the food traveling through  a ferret’s digestive tract in about four hours. That’s not enough time to break down vegetables (i.e., fiber). Ferrets are thus prone to bacterial infections since they cannot use fiber to push such bacteria out of the system.

In addition, you may be surprised to know that some foods can easily get stuck inside ferret intestines, which are narrower than a standard drinking straw.

Meat Protein
Generally, ferrets need a diet of 35% to 40% percent meat/animal protein. (Those with kidney or liver problems need a little less. In such cases, consult a veterinarian for the proper amount.)

As you may know, protein can come from plant or meat sources. Ferrets need meat. In fact, if you are using pre-packaged ferret food, make sure at least one to two items in the top five ingredients are meat, rather than a plant protein, grain, or sugar.

Acceptable meat protein sources are chicken, turkey, fish, egg, egg product, liver, lamb, venison, and beef. Some ferret owners claim pork products cause digestive problems.

Fat
OK, so if protein makes up 40% of the ferret diet, what about the other 60%? About half of that remainder should be fat. However, this amount varies by the age of the ferret – active kits need more, and sedentary, older ferrets need less (only about 18%).

Other foods
The remaining 30% or so of a ferret’s diet may include plant products, including plant protein (which is indeed different from meat protein). Plant protein and other fibers help to bind food together so it is less crumbly. This is where the occasional treat comes in. Good choices include soft fruits (such as apples and melons), soft vegetables (such as cucumbers), and cheese. However, these should be rare treats, indeed, never more that a ¼ teaspoon every third day or so.

Now that you know what a ferret should eat, you should also know what foods it shouldn’t eat. These include carbohydrates and sugars. Do not give your ferret dried, hard-fleshed, or sugary fruit or hard vegetables as they can block the digestive tract.

Also, avoid giving your ferret ice cream or milk as they can upset a ferret’s digestive system. Ferrets have lower levels of lactase – the enzyme that digests dairy products – than humans have.

You may think it’s cute to give your ferret “people food” like cereal, chocolate, or raisins. While in the past these were encouraged, recent studies have shown that these are not good for ferrets.

Which foods to use
There are several ferret-food options. You can use dried or canned food made especially for ferrets. You can follow a whole-prey diet or a raw-food diet, or you can use a combination of these.  Here’s what you need to know.

There is no hard and fast rule as to whether pre-packaged, raw, or whole-prey foods are best for your ferret. However, if your ferret has been eating solely a pre-packaged diet, it may be a challenge to introduce raw or whole-prey foods at first. Many owners find that combining the raw or whole-prey with the pre-packaged food acclimates their fuzzies to their new diet fairly easily.

Prepackaged foods
While it’s true that many ferret owners consider pre-processed food less expensive and easier to manage, it’s important to remember that ferret foods are not all the same. The cheaper brands may have fillers like grains and sugars that are not good for your ferret. In fact, they could cause digestive problems such as gastroenteritis, insulinomas, and digestive stones. These will not only harm your ferret; they will also lead to more veterinary visits and thus cost you more money in the long run.

Here are some widely recommended ferret-food companies:

These companies and their products are readily found online and at major pet-supply stores.

If you decide to try dry ferret food, look for a pure meat kibble – no corn, vegetables, sugars, or anything else.  Sprinkle a few drops of water on the dry kibble and heat it in the microwave for a few seconds. This will make it easier for your ferret to chew and possibly prevent a choking hazard.

Wet (canned) ferret food is usually a better option because it is easier for your ferret to eat. It also comes in different flavors – so if your fuzzy doesn’t like one type, try another the next time. However, many owners find that canned food contains so much water that their ferrets eat more of it, thus costing more in the long run. And the fuzzies may become overweight into the bargain.

Don’t think you can cheat by using food designed for cats, dogs, or other critters either. EachMarshall Premium Ferret Diet species has its own nutritional needs. Dog food was designed for dogs, cat food for cats, and so on.  A ferret needs food created for ferrets. (However, if you’re completely out of ferret food and the pet store is temporarily out of stock, you could use a very high-quality cat food for a short time. But return to ferret food as soon as possible.)

You don’t need to leave a huge amount of food in the cage. Ferrets are usually pretty good about eating only when they are hungry. Always leave some food in the cage to be ready when that hunger strikes, but check it often throughout the day.

Are You Right for a Pet Ferret?

Friends and acquaintances often ask me about getting a pet ferret. I tell them, of course, that ferrets make great pets – and then I give them my standard caveat. And that is that ferrets are high-maintenance pets and require commitment, both financially and time-wise. But as Pet Ferrets Sleeping in Laundry Basketyou suspect or maybe know already, it’s all worth it.

A prospective or new ferret owner, then, needs to determine whether he or she is the right person to own a ferret? Below are a few questions you can ask yourself to find out whether a ferret is right for you and whether you are right for a ferret.

Can I afford a pet ferret?
Buying or adopting a ferret begins at around $140. Then there is the additional $100-$200 for supplies, another $50 or so for food, and probably $300-$400 in vet bills for the first year alone. (And don’t forget various supplies and accessories like toys, litter pans, water bottles, toys, bedding, vitamins, and, of course, toys.) If you add these numbers up, you’ll see that, as with any other member of your family, there is a definite financial commitment involved.

Do I have the necessary time?
To be and remain healthy and happy, a pet ferret needs to spend a minimum of two hours each day outside the cage. They need some freedom and lots of playtime, as well as some fresh air and sunshine. And because ferrets are notorious for hiding in the most unusual places, it’s better and safer if you spend that free time with them. Also, the whole purpose of having a pet is companionship. Does your schedule permit this kind of time commitment?

Do I have the space?
A quality ferret cage is a necessary ferret accessory. Most ferret cages measure at least 18 inches high by 18 inches wide by 30 inches deep (the absolute minimum amount of space for a single ferret). Do you have a place in your home big enough to hold the cage and other accessories (for example, toys, extra bedding, litter, food, and so on)? Is that space in a separate room that can be closed off when needed (because, as mentioned above, pet ferrets need a safe play area)?

Am I tolerant and willing to adjust?
If you’ve never owned a ferret before, you may be surprised at the number of adjustments you and your family will have to make. For one thing, ferrets are very active. If you aren’t used to the sounds of animals running around like mad at seemingly all hours, your ferret may drive you crazy. Ferrets are also notorious thieves – which means you will need to be prepared to frequently retrieve small items (such as shoes and brushes) from under your bed and/or dresser. For another thing, ferrets have a distinctive musky scent, and although there are quality ferret products that help control this scent, it is still something that may take some getting used to.

Am I diligent and able to commit to a daily care regimen?
Ferrets, like all creatures, need the right kind of care in order to thrive. Otherwise, they can become sick and even die – domesticated ferrets are prone to several health issues that require constant vigilance on you part. Will you be able to keep up with a ferret’s food, water, exercise, cleaning, vitamins, supplements, vaccinations, and veterinarian visits?

Am I willing to adopt more than one ferret?
Ferrets are very social creatures and do not do well alone. That’s why many people who buy or adopt one ferret often wind up bringing in another one soon after. To be truly happy, a pet ferret needs ferret companionship (as well as your companionship, of course). So if you’ve already answered “Yes” to the first five questions, it may be a good idea to multiply those answers by at least two.

Is it legal to own a ferret in my area?
This may seem obvious, but we often forget to check such things beforehand. So keep in mind that a few states and some municipalities have banned ferrets as pets (often as a result of merely being inadequately informed about ferrets). Make sure, then, before you adopt a pet ferret, that it legal for you to do so where you live. You can find a listing of places (both states and cities) where ferrets are illegal here.

So there ya go. Now you know whether you are right for a pet ferret. Keep in mind, though, that you don’t really ever own pet ferrets – you just share your home with them. Just make sure you have plenty of ferret toys on hand to keep them occupied and happy.

Essential Ferret Supplies, Part 2

We’ve discussed essential ferret supplies and ferret accessories. Now, where can you find them? There are several options.

Pet store. The most obvious option is to go to your local pet store where you’ll likely find many brands and styles of ferret supplies. These items are all new so you won’t be inheriting someone else’s problem. Store employees can usually advise you on general pet care. The disadvantages are that pet-store items can be expensive, employees may not know much specifically about ferrets, and because ferrets are often considered to be “exotic” pets, the store may not stock many supplies.

Veterinarian’s office. Many vets have taken to selling pet supplies, especially vitamins, supplements, and other health-care items. If you have to visit the vet anyway, you can save yourself some time and gas by buying your ferret supplies at the same time. You’ll also have ready access to expert help: you can ask your vet about the item you are buying. But sometimes vets don’t actually know much about the item(s) in question. Some vets simply agree to stock the item in order to receive a portion of the proceeds.

Discount stores. Many general-merchandise stores have pet departments. Generally, this is fairly convenient. You can by ferret supplies while you buy your family’s weekly groceries. And discount-store prices are often much lower. Still, the store may not stock supplies specifically for ferrets. Further, the store staff also will not be likely to provide much ferret-related help.

Thrift stores. Many people have found pet cages, toys, and other supplies at their local charity thrift store. These stores are also great places to purchase old clothing for ferret bedding.  Prices are low, and items are pre-owned so you won’t fret if something is lost or broken. Also, pre-owned clothing is usually much softer than new. Your ferrets will love the softness. However, you don’t know where the item has been or why the previous owner donated it. Thus, it is essential to thoroughly clean and sanitize each item before providing it to your ferret.

Classified ads. Newspapers, ferret publications, and online classified-advertising sites frequently list items for sale by other owners. As with thrift stores, you can often find good items at excellent prices. You can ask the owner about why they want to sell them and even “pick his or her brain” about various aspects of ferret care. You need to be aware, though, that an unscrupulous seller may choose to not give you the full story about the item.

Rescue organizations. If there is a ferret organization in your area, this may be your best resource.  Many organizations accept donated items and refurbish them to offer to new owners for free or for a nominal donation. Ferret-rescue organizations generally offer many resources to owners. And any donation goes to help make the world a better place for ferrets. Ferret organizations vary in their operations, and not all organizations offer items for sale or donation.

See? With all these options available, you can easily find a way to get all the essential Story about Pet Ferretsupplies for your pet ferrets. Then, the only thing you’ll need to provide is love.

And be sure and check out our new ferret story titled “Danny and Oliver: A Ferret-Rescue Tale.”

Another New Ferret Story

Everyone loves a story with children and animals – especially when it has an ending that New Story for Ferret Loversmakes you smile. And that pretty well describes in broad strokes our new short story titled “Danny and Oliver: A Ferret-Rescue Tale.”

Here’s what our blurb says:

Twelve-year-old Danny McGuire loves his pet ferret, Oliver – but Danny’s parents don’t. They also think he should do more of the things “normal boys” do.

Still, Danny manages to remain fairly cheerful and keep his grades up. Oliver consoles him, his mountain-bike rides bring him solace, and his best friend Mike offers some hard-won advice.  It all works out, for the most part, until . . . things go terribly wrong.

But, then, it pays to remember that a rescue ferret can sometimes “rescue” a bad situation.

Strictly speaking “Danny and Oliver: A Ferret-Rescue Tale” is a children’s story. But it is also a story that, we think, will please ferret lovers of all ages.